Press release: Mt Messenger Bypass shameful disaster

11/12/2018

Climate Justice Taranaki are extremely disappointed at Commissioner Daysh’s decision to approve the Mt Messenger Bypass.

Mt_Messenger_tunnel

“To smash yet another pointless road through a wild valley with threatened endemic species is insane. We are in the middle of a climate emergency and a mass species extinction yet the crown’s NZTA dinosaur organisation still cannot see the writing on the wall. Wrecking forest, wetland and awa to save a dying trucking industry a few dollars and four minutes travel time is reckless, especially when funded by public money.

No mitigation will ever cover what has been destined for destruction and this country should be ashamed of yet another ‘clean, green’ fallacy.” said spokesperson Emily Bailey.

The group are considering appealing the decision in a hope to stop any future roads like this ever being approved in the country. Direct action is also being discussed.

We call on Ministers Phil Twyford and Julie Anne Genter to do what they can to prevent future disasters like this from being made. Repairing Aotearoa’s main trunk line for freight and passengers, expanding public transport, developing electric vehicle infrastructure and extending cycle lanes and walkways are the ways to go, not this backwards diesel disaster.” said Bailey.

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Press release: Electricarna – Sat 24 February

20/02/2018

Climate Justice Taranaki cordially invite Taranaki locals and visitors to the inaugural Electricarna this Sat 24 February, 3-7 pm at the New World carpark on Courtenay Street, New Plymouth.

The event will showcase a variety of electric vehicles (EVs) which are becoming popular alternatives to petrol guzzlers. Visitors will have the opportunity to meet passionate EV owners eager to share their knowledge and experience on their electric cars and bikes.

We are so excited to work with local EV enthusiasts who have made this event possible. The amount of energy and expertise is amazing!  It is clear that awareness on climate change is growing and people are embracing alternatives to fossil fuels.  Transport and agriculture are the biggest greenhouse gas emitters in New Zealand.  As more drivers shift to EVs, individually or community owned, and public transport also becomes electrified, New Zealand will come closer to becoming carbon zero,” said Catherine Cheung, spokesperson of Climate Justice Taranaki.

Stephen Hobo-Tuck, founder of Naki EV Owners Group and co-organiser of Electricarna, wanted a more personal and hands-on experience for EV owners in New Plymouth, so Electricarna is a way of meeting that need.

EVs are popping up in all sorts of places, being used as business vehicles and second family cars. The most popular model is the Nissan Leaf (LEAF stands for Leading, Environmentally Friendly, Affordable Family Vehicle) which comes in hatchback and van and has been around for 8 years now. BMW have the i3 model which is also well regarded, being more powerful and having more range than the Leaf. Top of the range is, of course, Elon Musk’s Tesla, with blistering performance and huge range, with a price to match. No matter how you look at it, electric vehicles are here to stay, so come along on Saturday and LOOK, LEARN and LOVE the new electric vehicles: the future of transport,”said Stephen Hobo-Tuck.

The organisers thank The Better NZ Trust – Leading the Charge, for their logistics support, New World for providing us with the venue, and Taranaki Environmental Education Trust for promotion.

https://www.facebook.com/events/230159787528621/?active_tab=about

Media:

New car event quietly cruises into town (TDN, 25 Feb 2018)

Electric spark to car events (EV Talk, 26 Feb 2018)


Press release: Vote for a realistic future

19/09/2017

renewable energy art fmj co uk

“Last week China joined the growing list of countries banning the import and construction of combustion engines. The next day a report came out on research showing NZ’s gas supply will run out in ten years and consumers should reconsider buying gas appliances. This week it’s Avgas supply problems and farmers protesting so-called fart tax and water tax” said Climate Justice Taranaki member Emily Bailey.

“Whoever you vote for this week at least do it with well-researched, independent facts about predictions for our future. Whether we like it or not, the future without fossil fuels is going to be very different. A continuing focus on short term gains driven by market interests, without enough thought for the next generations, will be our demise.”

“The last century and a half has been dominated by an economy largely based on milking cows thanks to cheap fossil fuels. In recent decades, oil and gas boomed and now it’s busting, as predicted. The huge long term costs of these industries are starting to hit home with climate change, polluted waterways and increasing social inequality, yet few seem keen to face this reality.”

“So while in the short term we might want to pay less taxes and not rock the boat, the reality is the boat has run out of fuel and is sinking. We can either pay the price to fix the boat and erect a sail or sink because the lifeboats were sold off long ago.”

“There are dairy farms in New Zealand that have reduced stock numbers and external inputs, substantially reducing their environmental affects while maintaining profit and improving workloads and job satisfaction. These changes are possible but they take a few years of transition and we need an industry behind it to also transition to low-energy production systems and local markets. Relying more on local markets is a huge shift for this country’s economy which has one of the highest export markets in the world. And we can’t all be dairy farmers. The natural environment and local markets need diversity.”

“We also need to start facing the fact that the next generations will not be driving combustion engines. This transition has been made all the more urgent by government reticence to act decisively, and by a culture of denial among the peak industry bodies, still myopically focused on business as usual. How will we maintain vehicles (electric or otherwise) and roads without coal to make steel and oil to fix roads? How will we dehydrate and transport all that milk powder or other produce around the country and overseas to our markets while paying off those huge farm debts?”

“The world is changing and fast. If a sustainable future isn’t your thing then at least vote for a realistic one that is not based on business as usual.”

 

Graphics: http://www.fmj.co.uk/serco-wins-38m-rushmoor-deal/


Exploitative verses sharing economy

05/05/2017

blasted home colorado 9News phosphate sharing combined

Photos: Explosion at a Colorado home on 1 May 2017 (photo 9News); Phosphate mining in Western Sahara (photo AFP); Sharing economy infographics

On 17th April, a home in Colorado was blasted to the ground, killing two people. The home was 178 feet (54 metres) from a recently restarted old gas well operated by Anadarko. The cause of the explosion: gas leak from a cut flow line off the gas well.

Such a loss is both terrible and preventable.  Many questions need to be answered: Read the rest of this entry »


From Day of Solutions to Climate Declaration, Zero Carbon Act & Community Korero

19/04/2017

oil, protest, greenpeace

The Peoples’ Climate Rally did not end with the blockade which was in itself a success. It was followed by a Day of Solutions featuring a popular electric vehicle display at the Huatoki Plaza where EV enthusiasts shared their knowledge and tips with the public the whole day long. Alongside the EV show in a public hall, committed researchers,  campaigners and businesses presented a series of informative and inspiring talks on topics from petroleum politics  to renewable energy technology, sustainable energy research at Parihaka Papakainga, Our Climate Declaration and a public forum on just transition from fossil fuels… Notably Our Climate Declaration calls on all of us to:

  • Stop the bad stuff
  • Bring on the good, and
  • Pressure government…

Last week, Generation Zero launched their blueprint for a Zero Carbon Act and is calling for cross-party support. The proposed Zero Carbon Act will require future governments to set five year ‘carbon budgets’ on track to the zero carbon target, set up an independent Climate Commission, conduct a National Climate Risk Assessment, a climate change adaptation programme, and transparent planning and reporting on New Zealand’s contributions to climate action in other countries.

Next Thur 27th April, Tu Tama Wahine o Taranaki is hosting a community korero titled Climate Change Impacts and Implications for Taranaki. All are welcome.

Indeed ‘to change everything, we need everyone’, as Naomi Klein said in her book. Together we are creating a brighter future everyday!

Photos: Participants of the Peoples’ Climate Rally at Owae Marae, by Jeremy Gould;  Electric vehicle show on Day of Solutions, by Donald Love, 23 March 2017


Council Candidates Questionnaire Responses

21/09/2013

Our councils hold a lot of power when it comes to deciding things like river protection, fossil fuel extraction and the sustainable (or not) future of our region. To help Taranaki residents decide who to vote for, we asked our 107 district and regional council candidates (less 3 who didn’t have email addresses) to answer 12 short questions. Many did not respond but those who did had very interesting answers which are encouraging to read. We would like to thank the 19 candidates who took the time to respond. Below are their quick responses to the first 7 questions. Long answers to all the 12 questions can be found in the PDF document at the bottom of this post.

New Plymouth District Council

NPDC Quick

Read the rest of this entry »