Press release: Petroleum companies under pressure

08/10/2018

protest-outside-todd-2oct18-kc.jpg

The pressure is building against oil, gas and coal companies in Aotearoa who continue to push for fossil fuel extraction with increasing community calls to curb climate change. Protesters will be gathering outside Todd Energy, Beach Energy and OMV tomorrow Tuesday 9 October.

The proposed amendments of the Crown Minerals Act, while banning new offshore exploratory permits, allows existing permit holders to keep drilling, and for new exploratory permits to be issued onshore in Taranaki. The amendments also take away protection of conservation lands, such as the national park, by allowing companies to conduct so-called ‘minimum impact activities’ within them.

Climate scientists are warning us today that it will take ‘far more aggressive’ efforts to limit warming to just 1.5 degrees and alleviate catastrophic impacts. Yet government policies continue to encourage resource exploitation and ignore the root cause of our climate crisis – economic growth from exploitation of the environment and people. It is up to everyone to turn this around and pressure decision makers and companies to get out of extractive industries,” said Emily Bailey of Climate Justice Taranaki.

Community pressure is rising across the country, with actions by Greenpeace, Oil Free Wellington, Oil Free Otago, other community groups and the Global Frack Down this month. Climate Justice Taranaki is holding weekly protests in New Plymouth, targeting the various oil companies operating here such as OMV, AWE, Beach Energy, Tamarind Resources, Tag Oil, Todd Energy and Greymouth Petroleum.

The message is clear: destroying our future for profit is completely unacceptable. Investors need to pull out of this criminal industry based on exploitation and pollution and give their money to regenerative agriculture, native forest plantings and community projects. These greedy companies have been warring over resources and destroying natural habitats for far too long. Their profit is our exploitation and we will not stand for it.” said Bailey.

Just transition must be genuine. Investing tens of millions of dollars now in hydrogen research and locking in multi-decadal assets for it, is not ‘just transition’ if natural gas is used as the feed-stock and power source. The claim for clean hydrogen is true only when water is used as feed-stock and renewable energies power the process. Sadly, this is unlikely to be the case in Taranaki, as it is not globally. PEPANZ’s statement earlier welcomed hydrogen development and referred to carbon capture and storage. These are unproven technologies that do nothing but prolong the fossil fuel industry.” said Catherine Cheung of Climate Justice Taranaki.

Beware of ‘false solutions’ that waste precious time and resources. What we need now are climate actions that constitute true solutions. The focus must be on substantially reducing greenhouse gas emissions, fostering social equity and building community resilience while every aspect of society weans themselves off fossil fuel reliance,” concluded Cheung.

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Exploitative verses sharing economy

05/05/2017

blasted home colorado 9News phosphate sharing combined

Photos: Explosion at a Colorado home on 1 May 2017 (photo 9News); Phosphate mining in Western Sahara (photo AFP); Sharing economy infographics

On 17th April, a home in Colorado was blasted to the ground, killing two people. The home was 178 feet (54 metres) from a recently restarted old gas well operated by Anadarko. The cause of the explosion: gas leak from a cut flow line off the gas well.

Such a loss is both terrible and preventable.  Many questions need to be answered: Read the rest of this entry »


Oil and gas exploration and extraction are important to our social, economic and cultural well-being, says Taranaki Regional Council

17/11/2016

draft-coastal-plan-coverWe cannot accept this statement, can you?

While a few may benefit financially from the oil and gas industry, local communities surrounded by oil and gas drilling, fracking, extraction and deepwell injection suffer as future generations are being robbed of a benign climate to live in. Yet council wants recognition for the industry as a policy in the Draft Coastal Plan for Taranaki (Policy 5b, Rules 11, 25-29).

The Draft Plan also proposes to allow the continuation of sewage (Rules 6 & 7) and industrial (Rules 12 & 13) discharge into our marine environment, despite the risks to human and environmental health and breaches on Maori rights (Wai-6).

If you don’t agree with what’s in the draft plan, then tell council. Use council’s online feedback form. You have until Friday 18 November 2016. The plan and associated documents are here.

Read CJT’s feedback to council here.


What has climate change got to do with Anthrax, human rights or New Zealand?

03/08/2016
Yamal herders crater Philippines Haiyan Urenui erosion combined

Photo credits below

Who would have thought climate change could have brought on an anthrax outbreak? Yet that’s exactly what’s happened. This week, a young boy in the Yamal Peninsula of Russia died and many herders were sent for hospital checks, the culprit being that an anthrax outbreak broke loose from the thawing of an infected reindeer (or possibly human) corpse. Read the rest of this entry »


STOS drilling permit reckless

05/06/2015

“It is aFeatured image real disappointment that the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) decided to grant Shell-Todd Oil Services (STOS) the full 35 years consent for more drilling, extraction, dumping and other damaging activities at the Maui gas field off the Taranaki coast” says Emily Bailey, member of Climate Justice Taranaki. “To allow more drilling from the aging wells – many of which have already passed their ‘best before’ dates – is reckless. Despite our detailed submission, the EPA did not insist on a bond that would ensure that wells are maintained, suspended and abandoned in a safe manner. There is also no condition requiring a decommissioning plan or liability insurance should something go seriously wrong.” Read the rest of this entry »


Industry spins: Time for some counter-arguments, anyone?

20/03/2015

A counter-spin here perhaps: Mighty River shutting down Southdown station (NZ Herald, 24 March 2015)

Region remains energised – report (TDN, 20 March)

Gas and renewables can be bedfellows (TDN, 16 March)

Beat climate change by finding more gas (TDN, 5 March) – Response from L DeVantier and C Cheung (TDN, 10March)


Help Fight Fossil Fuel Expansion: fund raising appeal

06/03/2015

Since 2010, Climate Justice Taranaki has been fighting the aggressive expansion of the fossil fuel industry, and raising awareness on climate change and social justice issues.

Last month, we wrote a 30 paged submission to the EPA asking them to decline Shell Todd Oil Services’ (STOS) application to further its drilling, production and discharge activities at the Maui platforms for another 35 years.

In our view the proposal does not meet the purpose of the EEZ Act—to promote sustainable management of natural resources. The Maui “field is now in its twilight years … STOS’ focus has shifted from … maximum reliable production, to finding … ways to economically unlock more difficult remaining volumes from the existing reservoirs…” STOS admits.

Drilling 22 side-track wells from existing wells and expecting the aging structures to withstand extreme weather events in coming decades is simply too risky.

We need expert witnesses and legal representation to best be able to present these, and additional arguments, including international obligations. We are therefore asking you for support.