Press release: Petroleum companies under pressure

08/10/2018

protest-outside-todd-2oct18-kc.jpg

The pressure is building against oil, gas and coal companies in Aotearoa who continue to push for fossil fuel extraction with increasing community calls to curb climate change. Protesters will be gathering outside Todd Energy, Beach Energy and OMV tomorrow Tuesday 9 October.

The proposed amendments of the Crown Minerals Act, while banning new offshore exploratory permits, allows existing permit holders to keep drilling, and for new exploratory permits to be issued onshore in Taranaki. The amendments also take away protection of conservation lands, such as the national park, by allowing companies to conduct so-called ‘minimum impact activities’ within them.

Climate scientists are warning us today that it will take ‘far more aggressive’ efforts to limit warming to just 1.5 degrees and alleviate catastrophic impacts. Yet government policies continue to encourage resource exploitation and ignore the root cause of our climate crisis – economic growth from exploitation of the environment and people. It is up to everyone to turn this around and pressure decision makers and companies to get out of extractive industries,” said Emily Bailey of Climate Justice Taranaki.

Community pressure is rising across the country, with actions by Greenpeace, Oil Free Wellington, Oil Free Otago, other community groups and the Global Frack Down this month. Climate Justice Taranaki is holding weekly protests in New Plymouth, targeting the various oil companies operating here such as OMV, AWE, Beach Energy, Tamarind Resources, Tag Oil, Todd Energy and Greymouth Petroleum.

The message is clear: destroying our future for profit is completely unacceptable. Investors need to pull out of this criminal industry based on exploitation and pollution and give their money to regenerative agriculture, native forest plantings and community projects. These greedy companies have been warring over resources and destroying natural habitats for far too long. Their profit is our exploitation and we will not stand for it.” said Bailey.

Just transition must be genuine. Investing tens of millions of dollars now in hydrogen research and locking in multi-decadal assets for it, is not ‘just transition’ if natural gas is used as the feed-stock and power source. The claim for clean hydrogen is true only when water is used as feed-stock and renewable energies power the process. Sadly, this is unlikely to be the case in Taranaki, as it is not globally. PEPANZ’s statement earlier welcomed hydrogen development and referred to carbon capture and storage. These are unproven technologies that do nothing but prolong the fossil fuel industry.” said Catherine Cheung of Climate Justice Taranaki.

Beware of ‘false solutions’ that waste precious time and resources. What we need now are climate actions that constitute true solutions. The focus must be on substantially reducing greenhouse gas emissions, fostering social equity and building community resilience while every aspect of society weans themselves off fossil fuel reliance,” concluded Cheung.

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Game-changer

04/11/2017

NZPAM Schlumberger Taranaki and NZOG Barque Clipper Whale CO2 trend combined

NZ Oil and Gas (NZOG) recently described a one-in-five chance of striking gas in the Barque field off Oamaru as a ’game-changer’. It made glowing claims on its potential economic and environmental benefits. Climate Justice Taranaki rejects these claims completely. Read the rest of this entry »


Press release: Vote for a realistic future

19/09/2017

renewable energy art fmj co uk

“Last week China joined the growing list of countries banning the import and construction of combustion engines. The next day a report came out on research showing NZ’s gas supply will run out in ten years and consumers should reconsider buying gas appliances. This week it’s Avgas supply problems and farmers protesting so-called fart tax and water tax” said Climate Justice Taranaki member Emily Bailey.

“Whoever you vote for this week at least do it with well-researched, independent facts about predictions for our future. Whether we like it or not, the future without fossil fuels is going to be very different. A continuing focus on short term gains driven by market interests, without enough thought for the next generations, will be our demise.”

“The last century and a half has been dominated by an economy largely based on milking cows thanks to cheap fossil fuels. In recent decades, oil and gas boomed and now it’s busting, as predicted. The huge long term costs of these industries are starting to hit home with climate change, polluted waterways and increasing social inequality, yet few seem keen to face this reality.”

“So while in the short term we might want to pay less taxes and not rock the boat, the reality is the boat has run out of fuel and is sinking. We can either pay the price to fix the boat and erect a sail or sink because the lifeboats were sold off long ago.”

“There are dairy farms in New Zealand that have reduced stock numbers and external inputs, substantially reducing their environmental affects while maintaining profit and improving workloads and job satisfaction. These changes are possible but they take a few years of transition and we need an industry behind it to also transition to low-energy production systems and local markets. Relying more on local markets is a huge shift for this country’s economy which has one of the highest export markets in the world. And we can’t all be dairy farmers. The natural environment and local markets need diversity.”

“We also need to start facing the fact that the next generations will not be driving combustion engines. This transition has been made all the more urgent by government reticence to act decisively, and by a culture of denial among the peak industry bodies, still myopically focused on business as usual. How will we maintain vehicles (electric or otherwise) and roads without coal to make steel and oil to fix roads? How will we dehydrate and transport all that milk powder or other produce around the country and overseas to our markets while paying off those huge farm debts?”

“The world is changing and fast. If a sustainable future isn’t your thing then at least vote for a realistic one that is not based on business as usual.”

 

Graphics: http://www.fmj.co.uk/serco-wins-38m-rushmoor-deal/


Exploitative verses sharing economy

05/05/2017

blasted home colorado 9News phosphate sharing combined

Photos: Explosion at a Colorado home on 1 May 2017 (photo 9News); Phosphate mining in Western Sahara (photo AFP); Sharing economy infographics

On 17th April, a home in Colorado was blasted to the ground, killing two people. The home was 178 feet (54 metres) from a recently restarted old gas well operated by Anadarko. The cause of the explosion: gas leak from a cut flow line off the gas well.

Such a loss is both terrible and preventable.  Many questions need to be answered: Read the rest of this entry »


Fewer cows, cleaner water & safer climate

28/04/2017

Today we told the government what we think about its ‘Clean Water‘ document:

  • Rivers that are ‘suitable for swimming more than 80% of the time‘ are not swimmable
  • The shift of E.coli guideline to 540 per 100 mls is unacceptable
  • All rivers and lakes where communities use or seek to use for recreation should be included for improvement, not just ‘large’ ones
  • Residues of pesticides and hydrocarbons need to be included as additional attributes for determining ecological and human health risks of waterways
  • The life-supporting capacity of our waterways and the rights of communities and future generations to adequate and clean water must not be compromised by so-called economic arguments
  • National bottom lines for freshwater must not be breached because of polluting infrastructure
  • Support, not penalize, tangata whenua efforts in protecting the health of our waterways
  • Exclude stock from waterways, reduce stock number and halt further dairy conversion for the sake of clean water, ecosystem health and livable climate
  • Honour Te Mana o te Wai and invest in responsible and sustainable alternatives

Read our submission here with the case of the Waitara River.

Waitara warning signs combined April 2017 Janice Liddle

Photos courtesy of Friends of the Waitara River, April 2017

 


Victories, Resistance and Determination

04/09/2016

Victoria ban fracking Greenleft 31Aug16 collage for cjt blog 4sep2016

The last few weeks and months have seen a series of encouraging wins on the environmental front: Read the rest of this entry »


Media Release: Landfarming – Toxic waste disposal or recycling of rocks, mud and minerals?

20/07/2016
BTW Oeo landfarm incidence 2014 TRC 1280327

Photos from TRC monitoring report on BTW Oeo landfarm, June 2014

Petroleum Exploration and Production Association of New Zealand (PEPANZ) Chief Executive Cameron Madgwick said, “landfarming is nothing more than taking the ground-up rocks, mud and minerals left over from drilling activities and recycling them by placing them underneath the topsoil.

Unfortunately, the facts tell a different story. As Climate Justice Taranaki Inc. (CJT) pointed out at the public hearings on the Proposed South Taranaki District Plan, the euphemistically termed ‘landfarming’ is actually the spreading of contaminated oil/gas wastes on farmland, and mostly on the coast in South Taranaki. Read the rest of this entry »